Schmidt’s Silver Noggin Cone Top Can, 1946 American Can Company

Schmidt's cone top beer can

(C) 2017 popsonhops

Schmidt’s Silver Noggin Cone Top Can

It doesn’t take long to figure out why this cone top beer can is my favorite can from my collection. As you can see, the label is misprinted and appears upside down on this particular cone top can. I’m not sure how many ended up this way but considering the condition and the fact this can is more than 70 years old, it’s got a lot going for it.

I acquired this can via a friend that owned a baseball card store in the early 90’s. He knew I collected cans and one day, a “little old lady” walked into his store and pulled this can from a thick wrapping of toilet paper. She tells my friend that her husband drank the beer, put the cap back on and wrapped it up assuming it would be worth something someday. My friend assumed the husband died and the widow was selling off his belongings. In typical fashion, he asked what she wanted for it. I think the price was agreeable and I believe I paid him $20 for it.

What’s my beer can worth?

No references anywhere to be found. It seems that a “regular” Silver Noggin in similar condition sold on eBay a couple of years ago for $155. I’d have to say the misprint could easily double the value and I’d put it north of $300. When I’m gone, I’m hoping my wife reads this before she tosses all my collection in the recycling bin.

As I mentioned in my post on a Krueger Beer Can, cans were introduced in New Jersey by Krueger in 1935. Others followed suit and some even began producing beer cans like this one that mimicked bottles, cap and all. Frankly, I thought cone top style vanished by the mid-40’s but I’ve since read that they were still in existence into the 50’s.

The American Can Company did a great job using marks to indicate where a can was made and the year the can was printed. On my particular Schmidt’s Silver Noggin Cone Top Can, I found in the tiniest print “10 – A” and then a baseball diamond with two dots to the right of the diamond. The 10 indicates that it was made in Brooklyn. The baseball diamond marking means 1946. Who knew? I thought cone tops vanished by the early 40’s.

This is the link to website I used to date my can

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