Bar Harbor Cadillac Mountain Stout

Tasting: January 21, 2013
Style: Stout (Irish)

Cadillac Mountain Stout

Bar Harbor Cadillac Mountain
(c)2013 popsonhops

I’ll put stout into at least eight different varieties

Porter – is really the basis of stout. In the 18th century, a heavier darker porter became known as “stout porter”. Over time the porter part dropped off. I put porter in its own class – “stout light”. However, I’m seeing quite a few “imperial porters” that are really seem like stouts labeled as porters.

Dry or Irish Stout – Irish stout like Guinness is considered a light stout, if there is such a thing. I drank a Guinness at a party last summer and someone asked how I could drink such a heavy beer on such a hot day. By comparison to imperial stouts, the style is thin and has a distinctive roasted flavor.

Imperial Stout – may also be known as Russian imperial stout”. These brews are made to at least Double strength in alcohol by volume. It was originally made by Thrayer’s brewery in England for the Russian royal court of Catherine II. Like other exported styles, the high ABV served as a preservative for the long journey. You can still find the descendant of this 18th century stout in Courage.

Milk Stout – Milk stout will use lactic sugars derived from milk. Yeast cannot process lactose so the sugar lends sweetness to the finished product. Like oatmeal stouts, it gained popularity during an early 20th century “health kick.”

Oatmeal Stout – Oats have long been a part of brewing. Since brewers use only a small amount of oats (about .5%), oatmeal stout doesn’t taste of oatmeal. Rather the proteins and fats lend a creamy mouth feel to this stout variety.

Chocolate Stout – Chocolate malts can mimic chocolate flavoring – but additionally, brewers have taken to using real chocolate in their stouts.

Coffee Stout – here again, roasted malt grains can mimic coffee flavoring – but we find many brewers adding ground coffee or coffee beans to their mash.

Oyster Stout – This variety’s origin is a little sketchy. Were oysters used in the brewing process or were stouts billed as being good culinary companions to oysters. Well eventually, someone used oysters and others simply use oyster shells. The brine or calcium from the oyster lends to the body of the stout.

This one is Irish or Dry Stout and it comes from Maine’s Bar Harbor Brewing Company. The title of this beer comes from the Cadillac Mountain located in Acadia National Park in Bar Harbor. It has an ABV of 6.7%. It pours very still with very little head. Flavors are very demure – but not unexpected with the style. Subtle roasted grains and a wisp of coffee. Some creaminess leads to a flash of bitterness on the finish. I’m just not a fan of this style and this one doesn’t really impress. I’ll put it at 82 points.

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