Christmas Bomb by Prairie vs Gingerbread Stout by Hardywood

Christmas Bomb! vs. Gingerbread Stout

© 2015 popsonhops

Beer #: 878 & 879

Christmas Bomb! vs Gingerbread Stout

Gingerbread Stout is a sweet milk stout brewed with baby ginger and wildflower honey. It comes from Virginia based Hardywood Park Craft Brewery. Gingerbread Stout boasts an alcohol by volume (ABV) of 9.2% and the label further notes – “It tastes like freakin’ Christmas in a bottle!” Nice!

Christmas Bomb is a coffee-based stout brewed with Christmas spices. It comes from Prairie Artisan Ales of Oklahoma. According to what I’ve read, Christmas Bomb is Prairie’s acclaimed Bomb! Stout 96 points brewed with added Christmas spices.

Since these are both flavored stouts, an important part of the comparison is assessing the base stout. In that department, I give a big edge to Christmas Bomb! It certainly shows off its 11% ABV as it comes across as thicker and richer in the mouthfeel than its counterpart. The ginger in the Gingerbread stout could very well be acting as a palate cleanser and washing away any residuals but it comes across as unusually thin when compared to the velvety Christmas Bomb!

In the aroma and flavor department, I give the edge to Gingerbread Stout. It delivers on its promise and certainly does mimic real homemade gingerbread. An authentic and crisp ginger flavor that is layered dominantly over genuine vanilla and cinnamon flavors. Prairie’s Christmas Bomb! comes across as a bit artificial in both aroma and flavor. The green coffee flavor that makes regular Bomb! the legend it is has subsided under way too much pseudo ginger and nutmeg.

While flavor should point to a landslide victory for Gingerbread stout, I’m a sucker for viscosity and mouthfeel. This is probably the only reason the comparison comes out as closely as it does. I’ll put Christmas Bomb! at 88 points and Gingerbread Stout at 89 points.

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