Gose by Westbrook

Tasting: September 27, 2014
Style: Gose
Beer #: 621

© 2014 popsonhops

© 2014 popsonhops

Gose – pronounced (gos-uh) is ale that originated in Goslar, Germany in the 16th century. This salty and sour wheat beer nearly went extinct with the 1966 death of the last brew master in Leipzig producing the style. But Gose has had resurgence in Germany and with the growing popularity of “sour” or “wild” ales it has found a niche in the US craft beer market.

A little about “wild” or “sour” ales – while yeast is the most popular organism used to ferment beer – some brewers use wild yeast or bacteria to ferment beer. The bacteria used are harmless but move quicker than yeast to eat fermentable sugars and (like yeast) will convert these sugars to alcohol and carbonation. In Gose, a lactic acid bacteria is used.

If you’ve read this blog – or at least looked at my list of six-hundred plus beers – you’ll notice very little in the way of wild or sour ales. I think I’ve had two and did not like either experience. I think I described one as one part beer, one part wine and one part vinegar. I vowed to keep checking back on the style thinking that my evolving palate would catch up with this immensely popular style.

I didn’t buy this offering from Westbrook, it came as an extra in a trade that featured (no surprise) a stout from Westbrook – Mexican Cake.

Only 5 IBU and 4% ABV. The label adds that Gose is made with sea salt and coriander. It’s definitely a jolt to the tastebuds with some sharp apple cider and lemon out of the gate. Prickly to the tongue. It takes a while to settle a bit and to pick up a tad bit of saltiness on the finish. My tastebuds can’t seem to find the coriander either. This is certainly not as sour as the other sour ales I’ve had. I can see how people enjoy the style – it really is crisp and refreshing. On the plus side, I’ll say that I’m enjoying the aftertaste. Overall, I’m just not there on sours yet. 72 points

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