Great Divide – Yeti

Tasting: September 11, 2011
Style: Stout

When I brewed my own beer, I always tried to come up with a clever name for the beer. My first beer was named “Jungfrau”. Since I was a “virgin brewer”, I really wanted the German translation for “Virgin”, but “young girl” was the closest translation I could find. I just can’t see asking someone – hey do you have any of that “Young Girl”. I’d beg my wife to create labels for me and every once in a while she’d oblige me with a design. One that comes to mind was a stout called “Pig’s Head” – (an ode to my stubborn nature). My last brew was named “Anvil” – with the catch phrase “Pound an Anvil”. Unfortunately, my Anvil was pounded by some airborne organisms. But, nonetheless – I thought it was a cool name.

As you’d guess from my own attempts, I’d probably never have a career in naming beer. To me, probably the best named beers come from Lagunitas: Hairy Eyeball; Undercover Investigation Shut Down; Hop Stoopid and WTF to name a few. Take a look at a beer shelf and you’ll see that today’s beer seems to follow a few themes in their naming convention — biblical, beastly and some twist on the word hop. Great Divide out of Colorado seems to like the beastly route. They have beers like “Titan”, “Hoss”, “Hercules”, “Old Ruffian” and this stout — “Yeti”.

Yeti is offered in a number of styles: Belgian Style Yeti – Chocolate Yeti – Oak Aged Yeti. This one is simply “Yeti”. It’s an imperial stout. From the label — says it has massive hops that create a 75 IBU. Kind of surprising in a stout. Most the of IBU typically come from the bitter roasted malts (ala coffee). Also — 9.5 % ABV.

Pours dark with coffee colored head. Coffee, chocolate on the nose. Rich mouthfeel but a little fizzy. Coffee dominates at first. Then the hops kick in with a citrus (lemon) finish . Really and interesting and complex combination. here. I do get some earthy notes like oak and leather tucked in deep. Alcohol has perfect warmth. Really nice 89 points.

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