Molotov Cocktail by Evil Twin

Tasting: September 18, 2014
Style: Imperial IPA (Triple?)
Beer #: 615

© 2014 popsonhops.com

© 2014 popsonhops.com

Molotov Cocktail

Molotov cocktail was a term coined by the Finns during the Winter War (November 1939 – March 1940). During this early World War II conflict, Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov claimed that the cluster bombs dropped on Finland were actually humanitarian aid. The Finns started calling these bombs “Molotov breadbaskets”. In defense against the invading Soviets and their tanks, the Finns started using the more familiar bottle, fuse and flammable liquid. The Finns started to manufacture Molotov Cocktails at a distillery turned armory. The name – well, it was a cocktail to compliment with the bread.

This Molotov Cocktail comes in a twelve ounce bottle and packs a massive 13.0 % alcohol by volume. I guess all it needs is the wick. As with most Evil Twin creations, they’ve solicited the services of another brewery – this time it’s Fanø Bryghus of Denmark.

This beer is massively sweet of candy, simple syrup and tropical fruit. Some tangerine bitterness but believe it or not, it gets run over by the sweetness. It is billed as having a massive hop presence but all I get is some wisps of hop resin. Molotov Cocktail drinks like a dessert drink. Thick and rich mouthfeel with the alcohol fairly well concealed. If you’ve read my blog – you know I have a sweet tooth when it comes to beer and Molotov Cocktail ends up right in my wheelhouse – 93 points.

Molotov Cocktail with Simcoe

Tasting: February 22, 2016
Style: Imperial IPA (Triple?)
Beer #: 897

This bottle was a recommendation of a clerk at one of the stores I visit. I told him how much I like the original and wondered how the addition of Simcoe hops would impact this nectar-booze bomb. The addition of the muscular hops actually detracts from the experience for me. I’ll put the sequel at a disappointing 85 points.

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