Double D Dominion

Tasting: August 14, 2012
Style: IPA (2x)

Dominion Double D

This “bomber girl” is appropriately found on a “bomber” sized bottle. I think Annoying Orange really likes her, don’t you? It’s a beautiful label, truly reminiscent of the decorative painting found on World War II military aircraft. Nose artwork like this was begun for practical reasons of identifying friendly aircraft, but it evolved to very elegant graffiti artworks. Even though nose artwork was against regulation – it was not enforced by the military. I’d like to assume that the shoreline depicted on this label belongs to Delaware as this brewery’s home in Dover is also home to a large Air Force base.

This is the second of three releases in Dominion’s “bomber girl” series and it checks in at a robust 10.2% ABV and a strong IBU rating of 95. The brewery’s website describe Double D as flaunting sultry guava, mango and tropical fruit aromas, as a result of dry hopping with Citra and Simcoe hops. Brewed with light toasted malts and Bravo bittering hops, this double delights with smooth warming alcohols and a torrid finish. A daring draft, she is available for a limited duration. The label also says “Her parents named her Deanie Davis — but the Air Force called her double D”. I couldn’t find a Deanie Davis related to WW II plane, pilot or otherwise. I did find a red-headed WASP (Women’s Air Service Pilot) named Deanie Parrish and a Davis Air Force base in North Carolina. But I think the connection to a red-head wearing garters is a bit of a reach.

I have to concur with the sultry guava and tropical fruit in both the aroma and my first few sips. It’s truly like candy up front – then the alcohol burn and sharp hop finish come rolling in like thunder. The hops come over in strong lemon and piney resins. Nice sticky mouthfeel. I’ll call this one a nice surprise and I’ll put it at a very solid 90 points. Only that alcohol burn keeps this one from being a classic.

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