Ma & Double Dry-Hopped The Publick House

Double-Dry Hopped Publick House by Trillium Brewing Co. and Ma by Tree House Brewing Co.

(C) 2016 popsonhops

Double Dry-Hopped The Publick House & Ma in the morning sun.

Hey John, we haven’t met but I’d like to thank you for sending these two gems along to Chris. When Chris asked if I might want anything from Tree House, I laughed. I know the limitations of their offerings and doubted anyone would share their minimal haul. This really made my day.

Tasting: November 24, 2016
Style: Amber/Red Ale
ABV: 6.8%
Beer # 1,024

Ma

Because I have a problem, I’ve created a log of Tree House’s weekly releases over a six month period. Ma seems like a sparsely occasional release and I see another beer called Pa. Seems like a matched set.

Here are the notes from the brewery:

In commemoration of our head brewer and co-founder’s grandmother’s birthday, we have once again brewed this super fruity yet balanced amber ale! Hints of oranges, tangerines, and stone fruit grace the palate before a sweet malty caramel character provides balance and depth. A real treat that drinks well on any occasion. Happy Birthday, Ma. We love you!

Ma is a very special amber ale brewed in remembrance of Nate’s grandmother. A fiery Irish spirit who imparted deep values of dedication to family and love, Ma was one of a kind. This beer mirrors her spirit with bright notes of citrus, pine, and soft fruit boosted by a rich caramel base and a medium body. A wonderful beer to celebrate the New England transition to cooler weather. We encourage you to drink to honor Ma and to those whose souls we carry deep in our hearts.

I get the caramel that is typical in this style layered under some wonderful fruit flavors. Mostly apple, white grape, tangerine and some underlying pine. Seems like there’s more fruit as I work my way through this can. Ma is entirely drinkable and enjoyable. In conclusion, Ma gets 92 points.

Here’s a post on my last trip to Tree House

Tasting: November 24, 2016
Style: IPA
ABV: 7.3%
Beer # 1,025

Double Dry-Hopped The Publick House

We went to Tree House for their explanation on Ma therefore it’s only fair to go to Trillium for their take on Double Dry-Hopped The Publick House.

Brewed in appreciation of The Publick House, a craft beer mecca in Brookline, MA where close friends and warm hospitality welcome us time after time. The Publick House IPA features Citra, Centennial, and Columbus hops with an aroma bursting with fresh orange juice and under-ripe peach along with notes of toasted malt. The flavor profile is more bitter than our “Street” IPAs, but with a toasted, bready malt character to balance. Bitter grapefruit flavors emerge with mild pine on the finish.

I have a rule of thumb that says anything double dry hopped or dry hopped from Trillium will be awesome. Additionally, I have a rule that any pale ale or IPA from Trillium will be awesome. It seems like I don’t need to clue you in on how I think Double Dry-Hopped The Publick House will turn out.

Rather dank. In addition to their typical pithy style, this IPA delivers some nice pear and tangerine rind. I also get mild peach and candy sweetness.

In conclusion, Double Dry Hopped The Publick House gets 94 points.

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Beer of the Month Club

Beer(s) #: 611, 612, 613 & 614

© 2014 popsonhops

© 2014 popsonhops

Beer of the Month Club

About twenty-five years ago, my family bought me a beer of the month club membership. Every month, a package containing two different six packs of beer would arrive at my doorstep. On the plus side, the beer of the month club introduced me to my first pumpkin ale by Buffalo Bill and Rogue’s Dead Guy Ale. Unfortunately most of the twenty four different beers I received that year were not quite so memorable. For the most part, they ended up being my desperation beers or I pawned them off on friends.

Last week, my friend Mike invited me to stop by after work for a Heady Topper. How could I say no? I asked him about a a box of beer that I thought was a care package of Odell from his brother. With a puzzled look on his face, he told me that his family had bought him a beer of the month club membership. Mind you, Mike’s taste in beer is Heady Topper and everything else pales in comparison. He offered me a sampling of each of the four beers in the box. I politely refused at first but flashed to back to my own experience. I figured I was doing him a favor.

Flagship Ale by Grey Sail Brewing
Tasting: September 14, 2014
Style: Ale (Cream)
Beer #: 611
4.9% ABV

If you drive by the Anheuser Busch brewery in Newark, the air is filled with a sweet and pungent aroma of cooking wort. It’s a unique malt, lemongrass aroma. Flagship Ale isn’t offensive – but I wouldn’t go out of my way to have it again – 82 points.

Paleo IPA by North Country Brewing
Tasting: September 14, 2014
Style: IPA
Beer #: 612
6.4% ABV

Off bitter – clunky grass and lemon rind combination. 72 points.

Flying Jenny by Grey Sail Brewing
Tasting: September 14, 2014
Style: Pale Ale
Beer #: 613
5.3% ABV

Flying Jenny is probably the best of this quartet. Presents a nice balance of candy sweetness and lemongrass hops. It’s just too light. I’ll still put Flying Jenny at 85 points.

Station 33 Firehouse Red by North Country Brewing
Tasting: September 14, 2014
Style: Red Ale
Beer #: 614
5.5% ABV

The can says drink responsibly. I’ll take that advice and find something else to drink. very little flavor, but what flavor it does have is unpleasant. 63 points.

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Kroovy by Rushing Duck Brewing

Tasting: August 3, 2014
Style: Imperial Red Ale
Beer #: 569

© 2014

© 2014

Kroovy

Kroovy was a growler fill from Cable Beverage in Rockland County, NY. On the way home, I wondered where the term “growler” came from. If this was 1980 – I’d have to ask and probably believe my dad’s definition (of course he’d probably be right) but voila the internet provides the answer:

In the late 19th century and into the early 20th century, fresh beer was toted from the local pub to one’s home in a small galvanized pail with a lid. It was said that when the beer sloshed around the pail, the escaping CO2 created a rumbling or a growling sound.

Today growlers are made of glass and allow consumers to take home beer from small breweries that don’t have sophisticated canning/bottling operations. This particular growler is 16 ounces and cost me $3.99. The growler itself added $1.99 as a one time fee – but I’ll be able to reuse the bottle on return trips.

I’ve heard a lot about Rushing Duck and in particular their double IPA, War Elephant. That beer should be returning to Cable soon and will warrant a return visit and a larger growler. Kroovy has a rich red color and pours somewhat flat – I guess that could be expected considering it was poured off the tap and has been in my refrigerator for 30 hours. Kroovy offers up some rich dank hop flavor right out of the gate. Tons of grapefruit and pine but the wisp of caramel in a malt base falls a little short. Kroovy also gives me some nice black tea flavor. Not bad at all – not bad at all – 88 points.

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Tongue Buckler Ballast Point

Tasting: April 2, 2014
Style: Imperial Red Ale
Beer #: 526

Tongue Buckler Ballast Point

© 2014 popsonhops

Tongue Buckler

Beer might be the only product in which the brand names insinuate a possible negative experience by using the product. Do I want to cause permanent damage to my tastebuds with the likes of Palate Wrecker, Ruination and now Tongue Buckler? Would you buy a laundry detergent named Thread Burner? or a pair of scissors named Puncture Wound?

Of course, it’s all tongue in cheek – or rather tongue in palate. It’s meant to play up a popular aspect of beer – bitterness. While bitterness isn’t a popular flavor experience in general – it can be a tastebud treat when balanced off with a complementary flavor. Think sweet and sour. To me, there is nothing better than a high bitterness beer with a brawny sweet malt base.

Bitterness in beer generally comes from high alpha-acidic hops or roasted grains in darker beers. The term IBU or International Bitterness Units measures the amount of bitterness in beer and typically ranges from zero to one-hundred. Although difficult to measure beyond one-hundred, many brewers push their numeric ratings to imply maximum bitterness.

Some IBU examples:
An American Lager like Budweiser has a low IBU of around ten.
A pale ale like Sierra Nevada’s Pale Ale has an IBU of thirty-seven.
An IPA like Union Jack has an IBU of seventy-five

Tongue Buckler reports an IBU of 108 and has an alcohol by volume of 10%. Again, the high ABV indicates that quite a bit of malt was used and possibly some residual sweetness remain to balance out the experience. Red ales gain their color by slow roasting caramel malts.

Tongue Buckler is advertised as having the aroma of dried figs, lime, spruce and burnt sugar with hop influences that lend resinous blood orange and grapefruit flavor. I certainly get the signature caramelized sugar and crisp grapefruit hops. I don’t peg this as being as bitter as the IBU would indicate but of course, it’s rich with that caramelized sweetness to soften out the bitterness.

I’ll peg Tongue Buckler at 89 points.

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