Yin & Yang by Evil Twin

Tasting: October 14th & 15th, 2014
Style: Imperial IPA & Imperial Stout
Beer(s) # 629, # 630, # 631

© 2014 popsonhops.com

© 2014 popsonhops.com

Yin & Yang by Evil Twin

In Chinese philosophy, Yang Yin (or Yin-Yang) preaches the complimentary balance of opposite forces. Years ago, the familiar black and white symbol of Yin-Yang was described by a college professor of mine as two fish – one white and one black swimming in eternal intercourse. I never looked at the symbol the same.

yin-yang

The general thought is that certain existence can not exist without the existence of a contrary existence – or what would now be a complimentary existence – get it? I have to think of it as “shadows cannot exist without light”.

Yin or the dark side of the symbol is said to portray the things you’d expect from darkness like the moon or evil. In case you were wondering – women are categorized on this dark side of the ledger. Hey, don’t shoot the messenger. The white Yang on the other hand would be the sun to Yin’s moon.

Being that these two beers are from Evil Twin – I assume there is some Yin and Yang symbolism emanating from identical twin brothers who both happen to run two different nomadic brewing operations — Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergsø of Evil Twin and Mikkel Borg Bjergsø of Mikkeller. Their strained relationship is well chronicled and I guess you could say that their story and their opposing personalities complement by drawing attention to the other.

Yin & Yang by Evil Twin are complimentary parts of what makes a black and tan. A “Black and Tan” is a mix of stout and ale where the stout is drizzled over a spoon so it floats on top of the lighter colored ale. As you can see, I’ve failed miserably.

Yang & Yin Black and Tan pour

© 2014 popsonhops.com

Since Yin is the dark side it is naturally a imperial stout and Yang is its lighter Imperial IPA partner. Both pieces check in at an even 10% alcohol by volume. One other footnote before I crack these open – Evil Twin has utilized Two Roads Brewing Company in Connecticut to create both halves of the brewing Tao.

Yang by itself – very boozy, syrupy, vanilla. Not much hop profile. More like a barley wine – 86 points.
Yin by itself – big time roastiness with vanilla undertones. A bit boozy – 89 points.
Yang & Yin mix – at 50/50 – not bad. It has a strong scotch influence. The boozy syrup of Yang mellows out the roastiness into more of a smokey peat flavor. Actually, I’ll tuck this one ahead of both at 90 points.

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